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Wag!
Mar 3rd, 2013 by Noodlenuts

‘Fwip-fwip-fwip’

Okay, so the line above isn’t so much an introduction to this story as it is the sound at the heart of it—the sound of Earl the dog’s tail wagging.

In Wag!, cartoonist Patrick McDonnell has taken the beloved characters of his comic strip, Mutts, and used them to create a sweet, uncomplicated picture book about love and what makes us happy, framed by the simple question, “What make’s Earl’s tail wag?” Read the rest of this entry »

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Hairy Maclary
Sep 26th, 2010 by Noodlenuts

Age Range: Toddler, Preschool

The simple, rhyming stories of Hairy Maclary from Donaldson’s Dairy, his canine pals, and the mischief they get into are truly timeless and genuinely entertaining. I have yet to meet a child who doesn’t love them. Read the rest of this entry »

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The Kettles Get New Clothes
May 22nd, 2010 by Noodlenuts

“Follow me!” said Monsieur Pip, heading for the dressing rooms. “I have exactly what you need!”

SO THE KETTLES WENT IN . . .

 

When it comes to concepts taught in early childhood, we all know the drill:  alphabet, numbers, shapes, colours, opposites.  These are the basics, obvious to everyone, the building blocks that prepare children to understand more complex ideas.

But there are also concepts that we take for granted as adults, but which do not simply become apparent to youngsters one day out of the blue, like magic.  One of the most ubiquitous of these is the idea of patterns.  How DO toddlers and preschoolers learn what stripes, polka dots, checks or paisley are?

One answer is: they learn them from Dayle Ann Dodds’ The Kettles Get New Clothes. Read the rest of this entry »

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My Friend Lucky: A Love Story
May 20th, 2010 by Noodlenuts

My Friend Lucky is not your average book of opposites.  While it does take the standard format for this genre, with the contrasted pairs portrayed on opposing pages, and a bare minimum of text, the author gives us more than just the usual concrete opposites.  Along with big and small, and happy and sad, he uses this familiar format to illustrate more abstract ideas. Read the rest of this entry »

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The Toughest Cowboy: or How the Wild West Was Tamed
May 16th, 2010 by Noodlenuts

Grizz Brickbottom was the toughest cowboy ever to drive a herd of cattle across the open range. He drank a quart of Tabasco sauce a day, flossed his teeth with barbed wire, and kept a rattlesnake in his bedroll to cool his feet at night.

Based only on the above excerpt, one might expect The Toughest Cowboy to be nothing more than a fun story about grizzled cowpokes and their rough-and-tumble lives.  There is, however, far more to this wonderful book than initially meets the eye, as hinted at in the book’s subtitle: How the Wild West Was Tamed. Read the rest of this entry »

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Doggie in the Window
May 12th, 2010 by Noodlenuts

Doggie dreamed of being adopted by Mademoiselle Madeleine.  But no matter how cute Doggie was, how adorably he behaved, no matter how enthusiastically he wagged his tail, she didn’t seem to notice him . . .

 

Sometimes a book is just so straightforwardly appealing that it needs few additional words to recommend it.  Doggie in the Window is just such a book. Read the rest of this entry »

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Bertie Was a Watchdog
May 6th, 2010 by Noodlenuts

 

Bertie wasn’t called a watchdog because he was big,or mean, or scary. He was called a watchdog because he was about the size of a watch. Read the rest of this entry »

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