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Books for Preschoolers
May 6th, 2010 by Noodlenuts

Finally old enough to get the most out of a great story and beautiful pictures, constantly curious and wanting to learn new things,  open minded and full of imagination, 3- to 5-year-olds are the ideal age group when it comes to instilling a lifelong love of books.  But which books?  How do you find the sort of unique stories and gorgeous illustrations that will really show a preschooler what a wonder a book can be?  Easy!  Let Noodlenuts do it for you!

(left: Oak Reading Room by Naoko Stoop. For more of Naoko’s lovely nursery art, check out Naokosstoop.)

From awesome internationally-sourced books that are unlike anything you’ll see in your local bookstore, to the best of small, lesser-known North American publishers, to truly special books from bigger publishers, that may have gotten lost in the marketing crush of the “latest thing”, Noodlenuts has everything you could want for your preschooler’s library.  Beautiful, classic stories as well as bold, offbeat tales; unique subjects; exquisite language and vocabulary; stunning images—these are all things you’ll find in our Books for Preschoolers.

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Virginia Wolf
Mar 17th, 2014 by Noodlenuts

The whole house sank.
Up became down.
Bright became dim.
Glad became gloom.

It’s difficult to write about Virgina Wolf without resorting to hyperbole. Picture books about siblings are a dime a dozen, but it’s obvious as soon as you start reading this one that it’s special . . .

Read the rest of this entry »

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When Stravinsky Met Nijinsky: Two Artists, Their Ballet, and One Extraordinary Riot
Mar 13th, 2014 by Noodlenuts

 Stravinsky inspired Nijinsky.
Nijinsky inspired Stravinsky.
Together they decided to dream of something different and new.

When I was about four or five years old, I was taken to see The Nutcracker, and like any kid, I promptly fell in love with ballet, pirouetting my way through the house for weeks afterwards. But instead of contributing to my new games of pretend by buying me a tutu, my father bought me a Tchaikovsky record, Read the rest of this entry »

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Rain!
May 4th, 2013 by Noodlenuts

“Rain!”

“Rain!”

A single word, in two different voices, prompts a heart-warming exploration of optimism vs. cynicism in Linda Ashman’s Rain!

I’ll admit it: I have a particular fondness both for intergenerational picture books and crotchety old people (at least, in writing—maybe not so much in real life). I’m not at all a fan of the treacly or saccharine in children’s literature, but I do love a story that reflects the real-life magic that often happens when the very young connect with the elderly. Read the rest of this entry »

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Interrupting Chicken
May 4th, 2013 by Noodlenuts

“Chicken.”

“Yes, Papa?”

“You interrupted the story. Try not to get so involved.”

Bedtime stories are a cherished tradition for most families, and one I wholeheartedly endorse. There are few better times to share a great story than when you’re snuggled up with your sleepy kids at the end of the day. And most of the time, a gentle, quiet, calm-inducing story is exactly what’s called for in that situation. But every once in a while, the usual bedtime stories get a bit tedious, and that’s where Interrupting Chicken comes in. Read the rest of this entry »

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How Do You Wokka-Wokka?
Mar 3rd, 2013 by Noodlenuts

Do your funky wokka,
get your dance on.

Some picture books are about stories—fantastic tales you can get lost in. Other picture books are about concepts—new ideas for kids to wrap their hungry minds around. But some of my favourite picture books, like Elizabeth Bluemle’s How Do you Wokka-Wokka?, are really just all about the sound effects.

Sound effects? Really?

Yup. Sound effects. Read the rest of this entry »

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Extra Yarn
Mar 3rd, 2013 by Noodlenuts

So Annabelle made sweaters for things
that didn’t even wear sweaters.

Some people might tell you that Extra Yarn is a book about generosity, and I guess they’re probably right. But what comes to my mind when I read Mac Barnett’s story about a little girl, her magically endless supply of colourful yarn, and what she chooses to do with that gift, I think of something my mother used to tell my sisters and me when we were small: “You can never run out of love, or have to divide it between people, because each new person brings their own entirely new source of love along with them.”

 

So when I read Extra Yarn, what I see is a book about love. Read the rest of this entry »

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No Bears
Oct 21st, 2012 by Noodlenuts

I’m tired of bears. Every time you read a book, it’s just BEARS BEARS BEARS . . .
You don’t need BEARS for a book.

There are few things I love more in a picture book than a premise that makes me laugh right off the bat. And the funny thing about No Bears is that the protagonist, Ella, is right. After all the recent bear books I’ve come across—from Big Bear Hug to I Want My Hat Back, and with apologies to my dear friend Karma Wilson, who writes wonderful books about a beloved bear—it made me giggle that much more to encounter a picture book specifically about NOT having bears in picture books. Read the rest of this entry »

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What Animals Really Like
Oct 21st, 2012 by Noodlenuts

“We are frogs, and we like tennis and most martial arts. Our favourite food is pizza with extra mushrooms, but with absolutely no tomatoes whatsoever.”

The legendary conductor Mr. Herbert Timberteeth is thrilled to present his latest song, in concert: “What Animals Like Most.”  The problem, as presented in the story of What Animals Like Most, is that Herbert hasn’t actually bothered to ask any of the animals what they really like most. And he’s about to find out at the most inopportune time . . . . Read the rest of this entry »

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My Name Is Elizabeth
Oct 7th, 2012 by Noodlenuts

“My NAME is ELIZABETH Alfreda Roxanne Carmelita Bluebell Jones!!”

As much as I love picture books (and I do LOVE picture books), every once in a while I start to worry that there aren’t any truly original ideas out there anymore—lots of lovely stories, beautifully illustrated, written in unique ways and from new perspectives, but nothing really fundamentally different. Then I’ll find a book like My Name Is Elizabeth and my faith will be restored. Read the rest of this entry »

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